Teaching / Academic Courses

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An introduction to the study of maritime historical and archaeological resources of North Carolina’s Outer Banks region.

4-week fieldschool somewhere in the world. Skills taught vary by location, but may include: shoreline mapping, site map preparation, project logistics, remote sensing.

2004: Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary, Alpena, MI (PI, Dr. Bradley Rodgers, Co-PI, Dr. Nathan Richards).

2005: USS Otsego, vicinity of Jamesville, NC, Roanoke River, NC (PI, Dr. Lawrence Babits, Co-PI, Dr. Nathan Richards).

2008: Shipwrecks of Black Bay, Bermuda (PI, Dr. Bradley Rodgers, Co-PI, Dr. Nathan Richards).

2010: Shipwrecks of North Carolina — Vicinity of Nags Head, NC (PI, Dr. Nathan Richards, Co-PI, Dr. Bradley Rodgers).

2015: Expedition Costa Rica I (Talamanca Coast — Cahuita and Puerto Viejo) (PI, Dr. Lynn Harris, Co-PI, Dr. Nathan Richards).

An examination of legal and professional issues of relevance to maritime archaeological and historical researchers. Topics include the examination of important legal cases, legislation, professional standards, grant writing, and scholarship.

The class is split into four thematic (but interconnected) blocks:

Weeks 1-5: Responsible research conduct
Weeks 6-11: Archaeological ethics
Weeks 12-14: Cultural Heritage Law
Week 14: Grants and educational standards

The fifteenth week will involve a presentation of the results of a major paper. Classes end, and a reading day occurs during Week 16. During Week 17, an exam covering all class content will occur.

Subjects covered, spring 2015:

Scientific research and ethics/decision making
Ethical decision making
Data acquisition and management
Mentoring, leadership and collaboration
Authorship
Publication and peer review
Misconduct in research
Intellectual property
Conflicts of interest and scientific objectivity
The ownership of cultural objects
Archaeologists and the living
Archaeologists and the dead
The antiquities trade
Overview: Maritime archaeological ethics
Antecedents to maritime law
Treasure hunting: The archaeological perspective
Treasure hunting: Commerce and collaboration
Treasure hunting discussion
Overview of US heritage law (ARPA, NAGPRA)
The Abandoned Shipwreck Act 1987
Sunken military craft (USA and abroad)
The UNESCO Convention on the Protection of the UCH
Codes of ethics: United States
Codes of ethics: International
Introduction to grant sources
Introduction to red tape: how grants work
Educational standards

Management of submerged cultural resources, museums, aquariums, science or other public or private local, state, and federal educational agencies. This topic is an issues based course. Discussions will revolve around communication and critique of issues pertaining to the nature and objectives of historical preservation and cultural resources management; priorities and products of submerged cultural resources management; the treatment of maritime cultural resources; the public benefits of archaeological management; cultural tourism and management; and archaeological education.

Topics covered

What is historical preservation & CRM?
Resources in Heritage Studies
Historical development of CRM in the USA
Global CRM
Legislation and regulation
Heritage values and special interests
Theory and concept of submerged CRM
Interpretation, events & products
Trails
Parks and preserves
Site significance assessment
Carrying capacity
Forecasting impact
In situ conservation
Predictive modeling
Economic modeling
Public benefits of archaeology & preservation
Public archaeology
Cultural tourism
Public programs
Archaeological education
The role of volunteers and avocational societies

Nautical Archaeology is a profession combining traditional fields and extensive practical experience. Anthropology, history, archaeology, geography and related sciences provide the theoretical and practical methodology with which maritime sites are found, tested and interpreted. At ECU, students are expected to be well versed in underwater archaeology’s theoretical methodology as well as its practical applications. Consequently, the field’s history, past theoretical approaches, and scientific inquiry are integrated with maritime themes. The class includes seminars with topical presentations and student-led discussions

Topics covered, include:

Introduction: What is archaeology/what is maritime archaeology?
What is theory ?
Antiquarianism
Culture history
Early processualism
The New Archaeology
Postprocessualism
Marxist archaeologies
Archaeology, gender and identity
Evolutionary archaeologies
Archaeology and History
Archaeology lies!
The development of diving
Early maritime archaeology
The birth of maritime archaeology
Studies in maritime site formation
Maritime material culture studies
Studies in nautical archaeology
Comparative & thematic studies
Studies of landscape
Reality Check: Theory in maritime archaeology careers

A detailed introduction to the research methods and the field equipment currently employed in maritime archaeology. This course is a prerequisite for participation at the Summer Field School. For most of the course, each week is separated into two sections; a theory component where the method is explained and illustrated with appropriate case studies in a formal lecture, and a practical component where students are taken into the field where they get a chance to use the equipment.

HIST6820 2015 Outline:

Introduction to HIST 6820
Archaeology underwater: Difficulties, budgets & logistics overview
The importance of “research first”: Lessons from case studies
Research methods: Introduction to sources
Charts and maps theory
Visual search techniques theory
Low-tech position fixing theory: Line of sight transits; photo transits; compass transits; sextant use
Low-tech position fixing exercises
High tech position fixing theory: Geographical Positioning Systems
High tech position fixing practice
Terrestrial survey theory
Underwater survey and mapping theory
Underwater survey mapping method practice: Not to scale sketches
Underwater survey mapping method practice: Scaled systems
Drafting
Site photography theory
Artifact photography theory
Artifact illustration theory
Artifact illustration practical
Excavation theory: Probing and Sampling
Post-project practices: Methods
Introduction to high-tech methods

6835. Advanced Methods for Maritime Archaeology (3). Same as MAST 6835 P: HIST 6820; consent of instructor. A detailed introduction to the high-tech field equipment and software currently employed in maritime archaeology.

HIST/MAST 6835, Fall 2011:

Introduction to HIST 6835;
Remote sensing in archaeology
Side scan sonar methodologies
Magnetometry methodologies
Sonar.Wiz 5 software
Hypack Max software

4-week fieldschool somewhere in the world. Skills taught vary by location, but may include: shoreline mapping, site map preparation, project logistics, remote sensing.

2004: Shipwrecks of the Tar River, NC (PI, Dr. Annalies Corbin, Co-PI, Dr. Nathan Richards).

2005: Joys shipwreck, Sturgeon Bay, WI & North Point, Thunder Bay, MI (PI, Dr. Bradley Rodgers, Co-PI, Dr. Nathan Richards).

2007: Ivanhoe shipwreck, Kauai, HI (PI, Dr. Nathan Richards, Co-PI, Dr. Bradley Rodgers).

2008: St. Georges Ship Graveyard, Bermuda (PI, Dr. Nathan Richards, Co-PI, Dr. David Stewart).

2012: Shipwrecks of the Outer Banks II (PI, Dr. Nathan Richards).

2013: Shipwrecks of the Outer Banks III (PI, Dr. Nathan Richards, Co-PI, Dr. David Stewart).

2016: Expedition Costa Rica II (Talamanca Coast — Cahuita and Puerto Viejo) (PI, Dr. Nathan Richards, Co-PI, Dr. Lynn Harris).